Amy Schumer Talks Getting Rid of 'TMI,' Motherhood, Quarantine, and the Advice She Got from Serena Williams: 'It’s Been a Crazy Time'

Amy Schumer Talks Getting Rid of ‘TMI,’ Motherhood, Quarantine, and the Advice She Got from Serena Williams: ‘It’s Been a Crazy Time’

During an interview with Buzzfeed, comedian Amy Schumer opens up about how she wants to get rid of the “TMI” (too much information) stigma surrounding postpartum periods and just periods in general. She also talked about how tennis star Serena Williams helped her get through her long postpartum recovery.

As Schumer explained to Buzzfeed, she doesn’t believe in TMI, especially when it comes to talking about women’s menstrual cycles. “I want to get rid of TMI,” Schumer said. “You’re welcome that we get our periods because that’s how we can have babies. That’s why there’s anybody alive, ever.”

Amy Schumer on Motherhood, TMI, and Postpartum Health

As the interview continued, Schumer admitted that she wasn’t prepared for her first postpartum period, nor did she realize that the irregularities would stick around for six months, but as she reveals, that normal for all moms who have just given birth. Even moms who had c-sections. “I had a C-section, so for some reason, I thought it might not be bad.”

And when it came to her postpartum recovery, both mentally and physically, Schumer revealed that she relied on her friend Serena Williams for guidance. Having just given birth and being a celebrity, there is a pressure that forces some famous moms to feel the need to “bounce back” right away.

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For Schumer, however, she “rejected” that idea “because it seemed so unrealistic to me.” Instead, the mom of one took home every pair of hospital underwear she could find and allowed her body the time to do what it needed to do after going through the trauma that is giving birth.

And she was honest about it on Instagram:

In fact, it was Williams who helped Schumer realize that it’s okay to go at her own pace.

“I also was lucky enough to talk to Serena Williams on the phone. She was patient with herself, and she’s the one who had to get back to playing tennis. So between my friends and the promises I made to myself, I was like, ‘I am in no rush.’ It’s now 14 months later, and I’m still in no rush. Someone could think that I’m in my second trimester. I’m not even joking. I really don’t feel any shame about that.”

And the fact that she got that advice from Williams; “Even to say that to you is insane,” Schumer admitted.

But it’s not just her famous friends, or even her friends from high school, that she turns to when she needs advice as a new mom. When it comes to what to do when your 1-year-old starts throwing tantrums and more, Schumer says she often turns to her large community of social media followers, many of whom are moms themselves for help as well.

And when it comes to raising her son, Gene, to be the best person he can be, Schumer says she hopes to teach her son how to be a “gentle feminist.” “

“You also think about the accountability of a son. He’s a big dude already, and he’s been walking since he was 10 months old. If he is being too rough with a little girl, I’m not going to be like, ‘Boys.’ I really want to teach him to be a really good, gentle feminist.”

As for how Schumer is staying mentally healthy during quarantine, she thanks her son for that. In fact, the mother-son duo has created a bit of a tradition of grabbing a stack of books before bed, crawling under the seat and spending time with one another before it’s lights out.

RELATED: Amy Schumer Wants Son Gene to Stay His Current Age Forever, Despite Him Having His First Temper Tantrum

“I don’t know how long that tradition is going to last — I’m appreciating every second,” Schumer told Buzzfeed, “because any day he might be like, ‘This isn’t for me anymore.’” How many parents can relate to that?

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