Do I have grounds to take my mom to court?

I’ve been living at my Grandma’s since I was a teen. I was the one who took care of my Grandma daily. I was the only one who was actually here for my Grandma. When she passed away, there was no will, so everything went to my aunt & mother. Well, my boyfriend and I have been staying here at my Grandma’s and paying the bills. It’s been ten months since she passed away & just last week, my mother comes to tell me that I’m going to have roommates. Mind you, I DON’T know these people. I got upset about it because she didn’t talk to me about it. They move in and start drama with my boyfriend & my mother doesn’t like him, so she told them that he wasn’t allowed here and that if he came to call the cops. Well, I disagree with what she told them to do because he’s the one that’s been paying the bills, we got into a huge argument, and she sent my brother to serve me a 30-day notice to get out. My two daughters, boyfriend & I don’t have anywhere to go! While my other brother and I were going through my Grandma’s things, we found a letter stating what my Grandma wanted for everyone and it was signed and dated. My brother showed it to my aunt and she ripped it up! Could we take them to court for it?

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If it wasn’t notarized it probably wouldn’t stand up in court.

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Wanted for everyone ? Or you get everything?

Also take them to court. Don’t ever bother with your mom again after that. You are just as eligible for that money as your mom and aunt

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talk to lawyer not Facebook and better move on it. you have rights since you lived and cared for her

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Just do a free consult from an attorney…chances are if it wasnt a legal document it might not matter

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You can also legally refuse an eviction notice it needs to be inwritting and they have to take you to court to evict you for it

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I would speak to a lawyer first and then go from there.

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Speak to a laywer. Also let your new roommates know that they need to change the bills into their name now they’ll be paying them all. That’ll kick up a stink as they obviously didn’t plan to have extra bills

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The only you would have a chase in court is if the note was notarized if it wasnt then If I was you I wouldnt bother…

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I’m not a lawyer and this is not legal advice so I’d def advise to do a consult with a real lawyer in your area. But I have watched enough judge judy to think that the letter you’re talking about probably wouldn’t be considered an actual legal document unless it was notorized. Or even had witnesses at the least maybe. Sadly it’s your word against theirs, and without actual acceptable proof it won’t change anything

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Definitely cut off power, water, etc. if you do move. Those deposits alone can hurt for them. But yes, look into a consult with a lawyer. Also, if you have the torn letter and other items with her handwriting that will definitely help.

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Till you have a court date I wouldn’t worry about moving . If your mail is delivered there for more then 30 days they can’t just kick you guys out and that goes for your boyfriend too. Your new roomies can call the cops all they want but he lives there . Also just to be petty if there is no written agreement I wouldn’t let them use anything that you bought for that house. Lock everything up till you speak with a lawyer and get a court date

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It won’t stand in court. If she’s gonna be homeless if evicted, there’s no money for an attorney. They likely won’t touch this with a 10 ft pole. If grandma wanted her to have it, she would’ve signed it over prior or solidified it in a real untouchable will. However, you can probably buy alot of time on an eviction. Best wishes

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So even with the letter stating what she wants, if there was not 2 witnesses that signed and are still living, it wont matter. My mom just passed away and her will means nothing. It was notarized but wills no longer need notarized. They need 2 witnesses that the court can call upon. I would get a lawyer.

In Texas a written will still works without having to be notarized I believe

Without that letter, and seeing as it wasn’t notorized or drawn up legally with a lawyer present I’m afraid you don’t have any grounds here. Unfortunately unless you can find a will she made before passing (but you already stated she didn’t) you’re screwed and legally the home belongs to your mother and aunt and they can do as they please. Including evicting you. They are going the proper way, filing with town office or court to do so if her brother served you with papers . Just make sure you stop by the presiding courts or call at least to make sure those documents are in fact legal. If they are, then you can try to fight it in court but you’ll have to pay to file for a civil case to be heard which could buy you some extra time to stay at the home. As for your boyfriend, you had no written agreement with your mother or aunt so they can’t just dictate who can or can not stay there while this process is going on.

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Unfortunately you don’t have a leg to stand on…be grateful you just have to leave and mom isn’t being an ultra bitch and making you pay for repairs too…even that letter wasn’t notarized so it meant nothing

You can take anyone to court for anything. That doesn’t always mean you’re going to win. I would fight it, but I don’t know how much success you’ll have when there was no will in place. Good luck!