I just found out my 8 year old cannot read: Advice?

Due to now homeschooling, I have found out that my eight-year-old son can’t read; he can’t even read simple three-letter words. He’s been doing phonics at school as an extra lesson because they said he was slightly behind but they never told me how bad he was. Every time I spoke to any teachers, they said he was doing fine, and there were no worries, but they have lied. The school realized he couldn’t read in year one and never told me. He’s now at the end of year 3. I’m now starting from scratch with his phonics on my own at home. I used to ask him to read his book at home, but he used to make excuses, now I know why. I am waiting to get him assessed for dyslexia. The school has decided to now putting him down as SEN. Has anybody got any ideas to help me get him to start reading and be able to read a book like other kids? I know he will never catch up to his friends. Please no bashing, if you don’t have anything nice to say then don’t comment please. I’m heartbroken as it is, I cry when I go to bed because of this. I just want to help my son.

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You should be getting him to read to you every night before bed… you shouldn’t only depend on school to teach him. Set an example for him which means when he sees you enjoying reading he will too.

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Don’t cry momma! It’s a bad situation but keep strong you can still help him! Abc mouse, pbs has great spelling shows such as super why, read together every day or night better to read about something he may be interested in

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You probably need to start at the basics and begin with the alphabet and what the letters are. Then teach him small words like cat, and dog and go from there.

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If you get your son into the right program and work extra with him, I am sure he will be just fine. Just make it fun.
Buy white boards, use colors, big letters, blocks with letters, make up word dances. Try not to let him see you’re upset because it might make him feel he is doing something wrong or ashamed.
So many…many things you can do to make catching up fun!

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Teach your monsters to read is a cool game that makes it fun for them. I know the struggle my son is 12 and we are still working on the reading he had a speech delay so went through all the programs, the frustration he feels is very real when he sees his siblings able to do these things. All kids learn at their own pace. I know all about the nights crying. Hardest thing to do is watch them struggle and feel helpless. You got this mama :hugs: he should be assessed for learning disabilities

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I agree you should have been working with your son outside of school and teaching him to read or reading to him… I mean how do you as the parent not know your kid can’t read? They only learn if they are taught and while the school does do most you should be doing your part too.

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Try frys first words. Make games out of it. Focus only on reading. Pete the cat has good books to start!

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Read the same toddler book to him, he will start to memorize the book and the words. Start with short, simple word books.

My son uses this raz kids app. It’s so helpful. They start off as a beginner & the difficulty increases as they improve. First they read the book (very simple words) to you. Then you try to read it & add the end they ask questions.

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Maybe start having him read CVC words to you (consonant vowel consonant - cat, dog, pig) make sure he knows the sounds before blending them. Then try our different books to see how hard they are. Try grade level books and then if they’re too hard maybe buy some basic baby/learn to read books. I am a paraprofessional and I teach phonics/reading and I have a 3rd grade student who is reading at a kindergarten level, he is in intense reading intervention and he has grown so much. Please feel free to shoot me a message and I will do what I can to help!

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my daughter has a learning disability in regards to reading…she is reading at a 1/2 grade level and she too is in 3rd…as frustrating as it is as a mom…its more frustrating for our kids…stay calm, you are doing everything right…look for books that have simple words, make flash cards…take the time to read out loud, make a note of the words he does know, have him write them down…the repetition helps…best of luck to you…hope any of this helps.

I second the bedtime story books, have him read I used to do it with my grandfather as a little girl. He won’t think anything of it then mommy and me at bed time.

Alpha blocks is a cute show that explains simple sounds and words my 3 boys 2 4 and 7 love it

Flash cards with words

They thought my daughter was incapable of reading all through middle school and failed to assess for dyslexia and instead replaced multiple other important classes with more reading classes, which did nothing but put her behind later. We later found out she’s severely dyslexic with letters and numbers as well as legally blind in her left eye from a chicken pox being in it. She’s 20 now and has learned ways to compensate with the help of a couple amazing high school teachers and even graduated with a 4.0 GPA and her CNA and CMA licenses.

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Ask the school or his teachers why and how they can help to get him at the level he should be !

Just keep reading. Everyday

My kids are still in preschool, but my friend used this for his son who’s 6 so I bought it for my kids too. My friends son took to it quickly and is now reading better than most of his class. The lessons are pretty quick too.

Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons https://www.amazon.com/dp/0671631985/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glc_fabc_obEeGbTEJZB9R

Similar situation happened to my son when he was in 3rd grade. He could read but not at the level he needed. I constantly spoke to the teacher and he told me he needed a little help but wasn’t bad. Kept him for tutoring and blah blah blah. I did have him read and noticed he struggled. Ended up having to get a tutor 3 days a week. He is now in 5th and doing much better. He is still young where he can catch up. Also request the school test him for a learning disability.