Is my child dyslexic or a slow learner?

Dyslexic child or slow learner? My daughter will be 7 in less than two months, and she’s in 1st grade. In pre-k and kindergarten, she didn’t have any problems; she was always ahead of the curve on most things and right where she should have been with the rest. This year she’s been falling farther and farther behind and struggles with some of the letters during spelling. She still mixes up b d p q, w m, u n, etc. We constantly work with her and remind her to slow down, and so does her teacher. She does great with every other subject at school and, for the most part, retains information after the first time she hears it. Her father is dyslexic, and his schooling experience was terrible because of how bad he struggled; he doesn’t even like her being in school because he’s terrified she will go through the same thing. We just want to be able to help her the best we can so she can do the best that she can. At what age can you usually tell if it’s dyslexia or if the child is just a slow learner? Any tips/ideas on how to help her? Is it possible for dyslexia to be passed down from parent to child, or is his dyslexia and her letter mixups completely unrelated?

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it could be anything maybe have her testing because not all mothers are doctors lol

My co worker highlights each line with different colors. She said its easier to read that the black on white contrast.

Why are you on here asking that? Why not get together with the teacher and the principal and ask them if they can test her…that’s the route I took for my youngest daughter. It helped. She learns differently than others children her age. Just set up a parent-teacher conference with the principal and bring up all your concerns about your child let them know her Dad has it and take it from there.

I would keep an eye out and bring it up to her pediatrician. Dyslexia is genetic. My husband is dyslexic, he was diagnosed when he was 10 I believe. So it could be a good chance.

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Good chance I’d get her tested. Then you n her teacher can work together on how to help her the best way possible

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My daughter has a depth perception problem and she is in vision therapy. She gets stuff like that mixed up also. Sometimes she’ll write complete sentences backwards including the letter and sometimes she won’t. Therapy is definitely helping her. And also she had amblyopia and her left eye was very weak and she would constantly not use it and her optometrist said sometimes kids don’t even notice one eye isn’t working correctly because the other one takes over

I knew in kindergarten that my oldest was dyslexic. Tell your husband school has come a long way! My daughter has an IEP (individual educational plan) and she has so many accommodations (test questions get read to her, she does speech to text because she can’t spell). It’s been amazing! She’s improved soooooo much with the help of her teachers. (She’s 11 now btw).

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Your school district needs to test her and provide her with whatever she needs . You have to demand it.

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First have her tested. Look for a dyslexia tutor in your area if she is dyslexic. They teach little tricks to use based individually according to what specific letters, numbers she is struggling with

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Get an eye exam done - my nephew did this and we took him to have an eye examination and he got glasses and has no problems at all now.

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She may just be a very fast reader.

I was diagnosed in 1st grade and was actually held back because they didnt figure it out until later in the year. There should be workers at the school that can help with this and figure out for sure if that is the issue. Good luck momma :two_hearts:

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I struggled really bad in school with dyslexia and ADD. I’d get her seen so she doesn’t suffer. I hate school and ended up dropping out in high school. My parents never medicated me so I feel that’s what held me back

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I could be many things but try working on 1 character at a time. A lot of kids mix them up for a while.

My son was like that (seeing things backward) I got a tutor for him and it took about 6 to 8 months of 1/2 hour a day tutoring to get it to where he could distinguish letters and words.

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Have her tested. I was tested in 3rd grade and it was found that I have a learning disability with decoding words. Once tested I was given the necessary ‘tools’ to help me with school. I recieved Honor Roll from 5th to 12th grade and graduated with honors.

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stop labeling your kids. give them a chance to grow up. 20 years ago, none of these problems existed. now every child has to be just like a stupid book says or they have a problem.

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As another dyslexic no she is not a slow learner she had to find hard to work around the dyslexia. Also they’re is a font that really helps, look up dyslexie, the letters are designed in a way that makes it easier to read. One thing I dealt with issue my dyslexia is when I am trying too hard to read the words will vanish off of the page. I have also read that sometimes cooked clear plastic sheets over the books one is reading helps, for me I had to use the colored bookmarks, to isolate the line I was trying to read. Also teach her spelling verbally, and top can make the school do verbal spelling testing, until she gets a better handle on her dyslexia.

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