Amber Trueblood

Amber Trueblood MFT, MBA is an author, retreat-host, and the mother of four sons. She’s an unapologetic bibliophile, having devoured over 250 books on behavior, management, systems, parenting, meditation, and self-development. Her expertise, experience, compassion, and humor result in a unique combination of entertainment and effectiveness with her clients. Interestingly, Amber wrote Stretch Marks, her debut book, while on a Broadway Tour with her husband and four sons, traversing over 60 cities across the U.S. and Canada. Amber is most passionate about providing mothers simple and realistic tools to guide them toward a happier, calmer parenting life. Her unique approach includes helping clients clarify their values and priorities, then showing them how to use that knowledge to make better discipline decisions, relieve mom-guilt, reduce self-judgment, and become a truly enlightened parent.

How to Differentiate Between Surface Self-Care and True Self-Care

How to Differentiate Between Surface Self-Care and True Self-Care

This is a guest post by author Amber Trueblood, MFT, MFA. She is the author of Stretch Marks and a mother-of-four. What is self-care? You’ve probably heard the term thrown about a lot over the last few years, as many people, including celebrities and influencers, have spoken about the importance of building a good self-care regiment. And while self-care has become a bit of a lifestyle “trend,” that doesn’t change the fact that true self-care is a vital part of living a happier, healthier, and less stressful life. And who doesn’t want that? So to that end, Amber Trueblood provides some tips on differentiating between surface self-care (the stuff that might feel or look like self-care on social media) and true self-care (things you do for yourself that actually improve your mental, physical, and emotional well-being.) What Is True Self-Care? True self-care provides lasting effects, which refuel you emotionally and physically longer than the time you’re actually doing the activity. Take exercise for example. If exercising for an hour a day only improved that one hour of your day, you probably wouldn’t do it at all. But the effects are ultimately cumulative. The more you exercise regularly, the better you feel throughout your …

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What to Do When Your Toddler Becomes Aggressive and Poorly Behaved at Home and School: Expert Amber Trueblood Shares Tips

What to Do When Your Toddler Becomes Aggressive and Poorly Behaved at Home and School: Expert Amber Trueblood Shares Tips

This is a guest post by author Amber Trueblood, MFT, MFA. She is the author of Stretch Marks and a mother-of-four. A Mamas Uncut Facebook fan writes in with a question. She has a 3-year-old son who has started getting into trouble at daycare a lot. He has become aggressive towards other kids and seems frustrated overall. He is also exhibiting signs of other behavioral issues at home, and this mom can’t find a way to improve the situation. She has tried punishment, she has tried positive reinforcement, but nothing seems to do the trick. Read this mom’s question, and Amber Trueblood’s response, below. “My 3-year-old son has been getting in trouble at daycare a lot. He hasn’t been listening, and he’s hitting and punching other kids…” Hey, mamas. So I decided to try something new with my 3-year-old. He has been getting in trouble at daycare a lot. He hasn’t been listening, and he’s hitting and punching other kids. He gets very frustrated very easily, and he doesn’t listen at home. He will just act like he doesn’t hear us, or if we ask him to do something, he tells us to do it instead. He back talks nonstop …

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